Common-Sense Congressional Districts

 

Every 20 years (1 year after census data published), the Speaker of the House of Representatives obtains the United States population from the United States Census Bureau for the most recent census figures.  The entire United States population is divided by the 435 seats in the House of Representatives, giving a general number of Americans who should be represented by each Congressional Seat.  This number is used to give a range of size for each congressional district (about 700,000).  The Speaker of the House then calculates the number of Congressional Seats for each state based on each State’s population.  This breakdown is reported to the entire House Chamber and debated.  The final results are voted on.  Once the breakdown passes the House of Representatives, it is given to the President to sign or veto.  After a breakdown passes the House of Representatives and is signed by the President, the measure is reviewed by the United Supreme Court Justices and must be agreed to by a majority of the Justices.

 

The measure is then passed on to the states to divide up their individual states into Congressional Districts.  Each State House of Representatives works to divide up its state into Congressional Districts, along county lines.  Counties that have large populations can be further broken down along City lines, and further by Wards.  This keeps the lines neat and clean. 

 

Each State presents at least 5 different Congressional Maps to the voters in the following election (midterm election).  The voters then vote, by popular vote of the state, on the Congressional Map they approve of most.

 

The winning map is then sent to the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives to make arrangements for the next class of Congress.

 

This gives the power of gerrymandering to the voters, not the politicians!

 

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