Congress Is a JOB

(Not a Lifelong Career)

Legislating can be a long, drawn-out process.  However, it should not take a person 20, 30, 40, or more years to accomplish their goals as a Senator or Representative.  If you have been in Congress for more than 10 years and you haven’t gotten your bills through Congress, either your bills are bad (why no one supports them), or you are ineffective as a Senator or Representative (couldn’t convince your colleagues to support your bills).  It’s a pretty good sign that you should probably go back home and let someone else give legislating a try. 

This nation is supposed to be a government “of the people, by the people, and for the people”.  This means that we are supposed to be ruled by normal, regular, everyday citizens, not an elite class of politicians.  We need to stop the establishment of a “political class”, that refuses to pass the torch of power.  Serving in Congress is supposed to be a duty, much like jury duty.  It is not supposed to be a lifetime career.

Term limits will not solve all of the “elitist” type of issues we have with Congress, but it will help to keep Congress from getting too far removed from the people they serve.  Only one limit needs to be imposed.  “No more than 12 years of service in Congress (combined between House and Senate).”  This can be a full 12 in the House, a full 12 years in the Senate, OR time in each chamber, not to exceed 12 years combined.

This ensures that we have a continuous flow of new people stepping up to serve our nation, shape of our nation, and move our nation forward.  Plus, when someone knows that he or she only has 12 years to achieve his or her goals in Congress, he or she will be less likely to drag his or her feet.  From the day he or she is sworn in, the clock is ticking.  Get it done or go home.  There would be a stronger incentive to get moving to get the job done. 

 

 

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