Post-Employment Lobbying Ban

Currently, there is a two-year post-employment lobbying ban on former members of the United States Senate[1] and a one-year post-employment lobbying ban on former members of the United States House of Representatives[2].  These bans are designed to make sure members of Congress cannot utilize their positions of power and relationships (with other members of Congress) that they have built during their time in Congress to later lobby those “friends” to pass bills that would favor and/or personally benefit that former member of Congress.

These bans do not go far enough.  A one-year or two-year ban does not hinder former members much.  Members of Congress should have a 10-year ban on post-employment lobbying.

If we are able to pass this bill, coupled with passing the term limit bill, this will severely hamper former members from being able to effectively lobby their former colleagues. 

Example

If a member of Congress serves Jan. 2019 - Dec. 2020, he or she would be banned from lobbying through Dec. 2030.  By Jan. 2031, the members of Congress that the former member worked with in 2019-2020, would have expired their term limits and would not be in Congress anymore. 

With these two bills, corruption in Washington can be seriously hampered, allowing members of Congress to better represent their respective constituents, rather than the interests of lobbyists. 

 

[1] United States Senate, Select Committee on Ethics, Guidance on the Post-Employment Contact Ban, May 24, 2012, https://www.ethics.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/files/serve?File_id=bf9ea0f9-2593-4f49-83b3-f581f86b9098, accessed February 2, 2019.

[2] United States House of Representatives, Committee on Ethics, Post-Employment Restrictions, https://ethics.house.gov/outside-employment-income/post-employment-restrictions, accessed February 2, 2019.

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